You may or may not have read my last post about Occupy Wall Street, and that’s just fine.  This is serving as a bit of a follow-up…

Since my last post, I have opened my ears and eyes a bit more, and as a result, I have become a bit more educated and informed about what is going on down on Wall Street, and throughout other cities in the world.  Since then, I have also received several mentions on other blogs related to Occupy Wall Street, and it’s begun to fascinate me how little attention Occupy Wall Street, or the other Occupy (insert city/state name here), have gained in the main media.  The media only seems interested when larger events, such as protestors being maced, or a large number were arrested when crossing the Brooklyn Bridge.

Take notes, friends.  This is something that is usually only seen and heard in history books.

But, are these news outlets doing their job?  Are they explaining to the people why these people are being maced, or arrested, or why they’re even there to begin with?  Is the “popular” media, making the protestors out to be harmful, destructive individuals, or people simply coming together to peacefully unite in change? Is the media doing its job? Or is New Media leading the way, while the “popular” media is taking a back seat ride and looking the other way?

I heard about the Brooklyn Bridge arrests and movements largely from Twitter, where Brooklyn Bridge was a trending topic for most of yesterday.  Most of my other news comes from the website Newser, where it seems most stories are written from AP journalists. Now, I know my last post about Occupy Wall Street I mentioned I don’t think they’re using social media to their highest advantage — and I still stand by that — but it fascinates me that seems to be the source where most information and news is coming from.

I’ve seen critiques about Occupy Wall Street, saying it’s lacking edge and demands, which could make it difficult to cover the news and explain what is going on when it appears so much is going on, but don’t you think the mainstream media has kept a little too quiet about it?

Something is happening, something is changing, and except for those in the action, the rest of us seem to be in the dark about it.  The only way we’re going to actually know what’s going on, it seems, is through the use of new media — like Facebook, Twitter and the blogosphere.

It seems more and more news surfaces each day from these events, from this revolution, but new media seems to be the source for all the information that people are searching for.  A revolution that has become to be known as Occupy Wall Street is becoming largely recognizable with a pound sign in front of it, or known in the world of social media as the “hashtag.” Coincidence? I doubt it.

I found out today, via Newser, that Marine veterans are going to Occupy Wall Street to protect the protestors.  This wasn’t reported by any large media sources, but rather a veteran Marine’s Facebook page.  See the article here. I want to know why “Newser” is the reporter on this, and not other media sources.  Is it not interesting that these veterans, who served in war, are going to fight, quite possibly, against the government and police, albeit peacefully.  Does this not say something about what is going on in these streets across the nation, across the world?

Occupy Wall Street is turning into Occupy America, with many citizens and cities joining in the action.  For a complete list, visit this website, and see how they’re using social media to their advantage, given that main-stream media has turned a deaf ear to them.

I want to know why the media seems be keeping quiet about all of this.  In my opinion, these are the kind of stories people eat up.  These movements do not happen everyday, especially one this large and that has lasted this long.  And those who have been camped out on Wall Street don’t seem to be thinking about giving in or packing up anytime soon. But, don’t you think it’s a bit of a problem when, in today’s day and age, it’s difficult to Google something and not find its definition?  That is the problem with Occupy Wall Street, and I agree with another blogger when I say it’s our turn to speak up and speak out and get this message out there.

This blogger, CyberWhaleWarrior, said “I have understood for some time that the mainstream media has its own agenda. Fret not. We are the new media now. You and I, we the people, are the voice to the masses. Far too often we hear, share and even witness vital issues that do not seem in the news or that are misreported by the media. This only reinforces evidence that the one percent are controlling the big media. I suggest that you embrace this new media. In fact, I recommend that you do not even speak to members of the mainstream media who have ignored you thus far. Forget them! Leave them out of the loop. They are of no use to us and will soon be obsolete. As word spreads of your efforts, people are reading #Occupy blogs instead of newspapers. As #OccupyWallStreet videos are shared throughout the globe, people are watching Youtube instead of television news. You are reaching people directly. You are touching them through their smart phones and computers and they understand that they are getting the real news directly from its original source. They are therefore enlightened to fact that our local and national news is being censored by the one percent.

Do not be swayed or disheartened. Persevere, for more will join you as you are making history.”

If I could have said it better, I would have, but he hit the nail on the head.

The days of popular media and the major media networks may not be coming to an end, but it’s time to recognize that there is a world outside of what they’re reporting.  It’s time to recognize that the main source of media is not the only source of news, and that we are becoming journalists responsible for reporting the news that is going on within our cities, our hometowns, our nation, and our world with one another.  It’s time to pay attention and speak up, because we have been given a voice — now it’s our time to use it.

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